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Does anticipation training affect drivers' risk taking?

McKenna, F. P., Horswill, M. S. and Alexander, J. L. (2006) Does anticipation training affect drivers' risk taking? Journal of Experimental Psychology-Applied, 12 (1). pp. 1-10. ISSN 1076-898X

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To link to this article DOI: 10.1037/1076-898x.12.1.1

Abstract/Summary

Skill and risk taking are argued to be independent and to require different remedial programs. However, it is possible to contend that skill-based training could be associated with an increase, a decrease, or no change in risk taking behavior. In 3 experiments, the authors examined the influence of a skill-based training program (hazard perception) on the risk taking behavior of car drivers (using video-based driving simulations). Experiment 1 demonstrated a decrease in risk taking for novice drivers. In Experiment 2, the authors examined the possibilities that the skills training might operate through either a nonspecific reduction in risk taking or a specific improvement in hazard perception. Evidence supported the latter. These findings were replicated in a more ecological context in Experiment 3, which compared advanced and nonadvanced police drivers.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences
ID Code:13943
Uncontrolled Keywords:speed, risk taking, training, driving, skill, ROAD TRAFFIC ACCIDENTS, OPERATOR SKILL TEST, INDIVIDUAL-DIFFERENCES, INVOLVEMENT, VIOLATIONS, BEHAVIOR, VALIDATION, STRATEGY, SAFETY, ERRORS

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