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A left-ear disadvantage for the presentation of irrelevant sound: manipulations of task requirements and changing state

Hadlington, L. J., Bridges, A. M. and Beaman, C. P. (2006) A left-ear disadvantage for the presentation of irrelevant sound: manipulations of task requirements and changing state. Brain and Cognition, 61 (2). pp. 159-171. ISSN 0278-2626

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To link to this article DOI: 10.1016/j.bandc.2005.11.006

Abstract/Summary

Three experiments attempted to clarify the effect of altering the spatial presentation of irrelevant auditory information. Previous research using serial recall tasks demonstrated a left-ear disadvantage for the presentation of irrelevant sounds (Hadlington, Bridges, & Darby, 2004). Experiments 1 and 2 examined the effects of manipulating the location of irrelevant sound on either a mental arithmetic task (Banbury & Berry, 1998) or a missing-item task (Jones & Macken, 1993; Experiment 4). Experiment 3 altered the amount of change in the irrelevant stream to assess how this affected the level of interference elicited. Two prerequisites appear necessary to produce the left-ear disadvantage; the presence of ordered structural changes in the irrelevant sound and the requirement for serial order processing of the attended information. The existence of a left-ear disadvantage highlights the role of the right hemisphere in the obligatory processing of auditory information. (c) 2006 Published by Elsevier Inc.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences
ID Code:14038
Uncontrolled Keywords:irrelevant sound effect, left-ear disadvantage, SHORT-TERM-MEMORY, WORKING-MEMORY, PHONOLOGICAL SIMILARITY, ORGANIZATIONAL-FACTORS, ORDER INFORMATION, IMMEDIATE MEMORY, SPATIAL, LOCATION, SERIAL-RECALL, SPEECH, PERCEPTION

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