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Interpreting information about medication side effects: differences in risk perception and intention to comply when medicines are prescribed for adults or young children

Berry, D.C. (2004) Interpreting information about medication side effects: differences in risk perception and intention to comply when medicines are prescribed for adults or young children. Psychology, Health & Medicine, 9 (2). pp. 227-234. ISSN 1354-8506

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To link to this article DOI: 10.1080/13548500410001670753

Abstract/Summary

This study investigates whether, and how, people's perception of risk and intended health behaviours are affected by whether a medicine is prescribed for themselves or for a young child. The question is relevant to the issue of whether it is beneficial to produce medicines information that is tailored to particular subgroups of the population, such as parents of young children. In the experiment, participants read scenarios which referred either to themselves or their (imagined) 1-year-old child, and were required to make a number of risk judgements. The results showed that both parents and non-parents were less satisfied, perceived side effects to be more severe and more likely to occur, risk to health to be higher, and said that they would be less likely to take (or give) the medicine when the recipient was the child. On the basis of the findings, it is suggested that it may well be beneficial to tailor materials to broader classes of patient type.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences
ID Code:14148

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