Accessibility navigation


Reverberant auditory environments: the effects of multiple echoes on distraction by 'irrelevant' speech

Beaman, C.P. and Holt, N. J. (2007) Reverberant auditory environments: the effects of multiple echoes on distraction by 'irrelevant' speech. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 21 (8). pp. 1077-1090. ISSN 0888-4080

Full text not archived in this repository.

To link to this article DOI: 10.1002/acp.1315

Abstract/Summary

Two experiments examine the effect on an immediate recall test of simulating a reverberant auditory environment in which auditory distracters in the form of speech are played to the participants (the 'irrelevant sound effect'). An echo-intensive environment simulated by the addition of reverberation to the speech reduced the extent of 'changes in state' in the irrelevant speech stream by smoothing the profile of the waveform. In both experiments, the reverberant auditory environment produced significantly smaller irrelevant sound distraction effects than an echo-free environment. Results are interpreted in terms of changing-state hypothesis, which states that acoustic content of irrelevant sound, rather than phonology or semantics, determines the extent of the irrelevant sound effect (ISE). Copyright (C) 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences
ID Code:14162
Uncontrolled Keywords:SHORT-TERM-MEMORY, CHANGING-STATE, WORKING-MEMORY, SERIAL-RECALL, OFFICE NOISE, SOUND, DISRUPTION, HABITUATION, ATTENTION, SUSCEPTIBILITY

University Staff: Request a correction | Centaur Editors: Update this record

Page navigation