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Auditory distraction from low-intensity noise: a review of the consequences for learning and workplace environments

Beaman, C. P. (2005) Auditory distraction from low-intensity noise: a review of the consequences for learning and workplace environments. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 19 (8). pp. 1041-1064. ISSN 0888-4080

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To link to this article DOI: 10.1002/acp.1134

Abstract/Summary

The 'irrelevant sound effect' in short-term memory is commonly believed to entail a number of direct consequences for cognitive performance in the office and other workplaces (e.g. S. P. Banbury, S. Tremblay, W. J. Macken, & D. M. Jones, 2001). It may also help to identify what types of sound are most suitable as auditory warning signals. However, the conclusions drawn are based primarily upon evidence from a single task (serial recall) and a single population (young adults). This evidence is reconsidered from the standpoint of different worker populations confronted with common workplace tasks and auditory environments. Recommendations are put forward for factors to be considered when assessing the impact of auditory distraction in the workplace. Copyright (c) 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences
ID Code:14168
Uncontrolled Keywords:SHORT-TERM-MEMORY, AIR-TRAFFIC-CONTROL, IRRELEVANT-SPEECH, WORKING-MEMORY, CHANGING-STATE, SERIAL-RECALL, PHONOLOGICAL SIMILARITY, ORGANIZATIONAL-FACTORS, UNATTENDED SPEECH, BACKGROUND MUSIC

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