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Prevalence of disorders of the autism spectrum in a population cohort of children in South Thames: the special needs and autism project (SNAP)

Baird, G., Simonoff, E., Pickles, A., Chandler, S., Loucas, T., Meldrum, D. and Charman, T. (2006) Prevalence of disorders of the autism spectrum in a population cohort of children in South Thames: the special needs and autism project (SNAP). Lancet, 368 (9531). pp. 210-215. ISSN 0140-6736

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To link to this article DOI: 10.1016/S0140-6736(06)69041-7

Abstract/Summary

Background Recent reports have suggested that the prevalence of autism and related spectrum disorders (ASDs) is substantially higher than previously recognised. We sought to quantify prevalence of ASDs in children in South Thames, UK. Methods Within a total population cohort of 56946 children aged 9-10 years, we screened all those with a current clinical diagnosis of ASD (n=255) or those judged to be at risk for being an undetected case (n=1515). A stratified subsample (n=255) received a comprehensive diagnostic assessment, including standardised clinical observation, and parent interview assessments of autistic symptoms, language, and intelligence quotient (IQ). Clinical consensus diagnoses of childhood autism and other ASDs were derived. We used a sample weighting procedure to estimate prevalence. Findings The prevalence of childhood autism was 38.9 per 10000 (95% CI 29.9-47.8) and that of other ASDs was 77.2 per 10000 (52.1-102.3), making the total prevalence of all AS Ds 116.1 per 10000 (90.4-141.8). A narrower definition of childhood autism, which combined clinical consensus with instrument criteria for past and current presentation, provided a prevalence of 24.8 per 10 000 (17.6-32.0). The rate of previous local identification was lowest for children of less educated parents. Interpretation Prevalence of autism and related ASDs is substantially greater than previously recognised. Whether the increase is due to better ascertainment, broadening diagnostic criteria, or increased incidence is unclear. Services in health, education, and social care will need to recognise the needs of children with some form of ASD, who constitute 1% of the child population.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Interdisciplinary centres and themes > ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorders) Research Network
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences
ID Code:14175
Uncontrolled Keywords:PERVASIVE DEVELOPMENTAL DISORDERS, PRESCHOOL-CHILDREN, EPIDEMIOLOGY

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