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Layer-by-layer electrostatic entrapment of protein molecules on superparamagnetic nanoparticle: new strategy to enhance adsorption capacity and maintain biological activity

Al-Saadi , A., Yu , C.H., Khutoryanskiy, V. V., Shih , S.-J., Crossley , A. and Tsang , S.C. (2009) Layer-by-layer electrostatic entrapment of protein molecules on superparamagnetic nanoparticle: new strategy to enhance adsorption capacity and maintain biological activity. Journal of Physical Chemistry C, 113 (34). pp. 15260-15265. ISSN 1932-7447

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To link to this article DOI: 10.1021/jp903100j

Abstract/Summary

There is a recent interest to use inorganic-based magnetic nanoparticles as a vehicle to carry biomolecules for various biophysical applications, but direct attachment of the molecules is known to alter their conformation leading to attenuation in activity. In addition, surface immobilization has been limited to monolayer coverage. It is shown that alternate depositions of negatively charged protein molecules, typically bovine serum albumin (BSA) with a positively charged aminocarbohydrate template such as glycol chitosan (GC) on magnetic iron oxide nanoparticle surface as a colloid, are carried out under pH 7.4. Circular dichroism (CD) clearly reveals that the secondary structure of the entrapped BSA sequential depositions in this manner remains totally unaltered which is in sharp contrast to previous attempts. Probing the binding properties of the entrapped BSA using small molecules (Site I and Site II drug compounds) confirms for the first time the full retention of its biological activity as compared with native BSA, which also implies the ready accessibility of the entrapped protein molecules through the porous overlayers. This work clearly suggests a new method to immobilize and store protein molecules beyond monolayer adsorption on a magnetic nanoparticle surface without much structural alteration. This may find applications in magnetic recoverable enzymes or protein delivery.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Chemistry, Food and Pharmacy > School of Pharmacy > Pharmaceutics Research Group
ID Code:1631
Uncontrolled Keywords:magnetic nanoparticles; silica nanoparticles; drug-delivery; conformational-changes; bsa; particles; stability; release; system
Publisher:American Chemical Society

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