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Electronic transitions and bonding properties in a series of five-coordinate “16-electron” complexes [Mn(CO)3(L2)]− (L2=chelating redox-active π-donor ligand)

Hartl, F., Rosa, P., Ricard, L., Lefloch, P. and Zalis, S. (2007) Electronic transitions and bonding properties in a series of five-coordinate “16-electron” complexes [Mn(CO)3(L2)]− (L2=chelating redox-active π-donor ligand). Coordination Chemistry Reviews, 251 (3-4). pp. 557-576. ISSN 0010-8545

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1016/j.ccr.2006.09.003

Abstract/Summary

In this article we present for the first time accurate density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent (TD) DFT data for a series of electronically unsaturated five-coordinate complexes [Mn(CO)(3)(L-2)](-), where L-2 stands for a chelating strong pi-donor ligand represented by catecholate, dithiolate, amidothiolate, reduced alpha-diimine (1,4-dialkyl-1,4-diazabutadiene (R-DAB), 2,2'-bipyridine) and reduced 2,2'-biphosphinine types. The single-crystal X-ray structure of the unusual compound [Na(BPY)][Mn(CO)(3)(BPY)]center dot Et2O and the electronic absorption spectrum of the anion [Mn(CO)(3)(BPY)](-) are new in the literature. The nature of the bidentate ligand determines the bonding in the complexes, which varies between two limiting forms: from completely pi-delocalized diamagnetic {(CO)(3)Mn-L-2}(-) for L-2 = alpha-diimine or biphosphinine, to largely valence-trapped {(CO)(3)Mn-1-L-2(2-)}(-) for L-2(2-) = catecholate, where the formal oxidation states of Mn and L-2 can be assigned. The variable degree of the pi-delocalization in the Mn(L-2) chelate ring is indicated by experimental resonance Raman spectra of [Mn(CO)(3)(L-2)](-) (L-2=3,5-di-tBu-catecholate and iPr-DAB), where accurate assignments of the diagnostically important Raman bands have been aided by vibrational analysis. The L-2 = catecholate type of complexes is known to react with Lewis bases (CO substitution, formation of six-coordinate adducts) while the strongly pi-delocalized complexes are inert. The five-coordinate complexes adopt usually a distorted square pyramidal geometry in the solid state, even though transitions to a trigonal bipyramid are also not rare. The experimental structural data and the corresponding DFT-computed values of bond lengths and angles are in a very good agreement. TD-DFT calculations of electronic absorption spectra of the studied Mn complexes and the strongly pi-delocalized reference compound [Fe(CO)(3)(Me-DAB)] have reproduced qualitatively well the experimental spectra. Analyses of the computed electronic transitions in the visible spectroscopic region show that the lowest-energy absorption band always contains a dominant (in some cases almost exclusive) contribution from a pi(HOMO) -> pi*(LUMO) transition within the MnL2 metallacycle. The character of this optical excitation depends strongly on the composition of the frontier orbitals, varying from a partial L-2 -> Mn charge transfer (LMCT) through a fully delocalized pi(MnL2) -> pi*(MnL2) situation to a mixed (CO)Mn -> L-2 charge transfer (LLCT/MLCT). The latter character is most apparent in the case of the reference complex [Fe(CO)(3)(Me-DAB)]. The higher-lying, usually strongly mixed electronic transitions in the visible absorption region originate in the three lower-lying occupied orbitals, HOMO - 1 to HOMO - 3, with significant metal-d contributions. Assignment of these optical excitations to electronic transitions of a specific type is difficult. A partial LLCT/MLCT character is encountered most frequently. The electronic absorption spectra become more complex when the chelating ligand L-2, such as 2,2'-bipyridine, features two or more closely spaced low-lying empty pi* orbitals.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Chemistry, Food and Pharmacy > Department of Chemistry
ID Code:17231
Publisher:Elsevier

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