Accessibility navigation


Biomass partitioning and growth efficiency in four naturally regenerated forest tree species

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

Konopka, B., Pajtik, J., Moravcik, M. and Lukac, M. (2010) Biomass partitioning and growth efficiency in four naturally regenerated forest tree species. Basic and Applied Ecology, 11 (3). pp. 234-243. ISSN 1439-1791

[img] Text (postprint-text) - Accepted Version
· Restricted to Repository staff only
· Please see our End User Agreement before downloading.

164Kb
[img] Text (Postprint - Figures) - Accepted Version
· Restricted to Repository staff only
· Please see our End User Agreement before downloading.

116Kb
[img] Text (postprint - tables) - Accepted Version
· Restricted to Repository staff only
· Please see our End User Agreement before downloading.

58Kb
[img] Text (postprint - appendix) - Accepted Version
· Restricted to Repository staff only
· Please see our End User Agreement before downloading.

345Kb
[img] Text (Postprint - manuscript) - Accepted Version
· Please see our End User Agreement before downloading.

163Kb
[img] Text (Postprint - figures) - Accepted Version
· Please see our End User Agreement before downloading.

85Kb
[img] Text (Postprint - tables) - Accepted Version
· Please see our End User Agreement before downloading.

28Kb
[img] Text (Postprint - Appendix) - Accepted Version
· Please see our End User Agreement before downloading.

345Kb

To link to this article DOI: 10.1016/j.baae.2010.02.004

Abstract/Summary

Current forest growth models and yield tables are almost exclusively based on data from mature trees, reducing their applicability to young and developing stands. To address this gap, young European beech, sessile oak, Scots pine and Norway spruce trees approximately 0 to 10 years old were destructively sampled in a range of naturally regenerated forest stands in Central Europe. Diameter at base and height were first measured in situ for up to 175 individuals per species. Subsequently, the trees were excavated and dry biomass of foliage, branches, stems and roots was measured. Allometric relations were then used to calculate biomass allocation coefficients (BAC) and growth efficiency (GE) patterns in young trees. We found large differences in BAC and GE between broadleaves and conifers, but also between species within these categories. Both BAC and GE are strongly age-specific in young trees, their rapidly changing values reflecting different growth strategies in the earliest stages of growth. We show that linear relationships describing biomass allocation in older trees are not applicable in young trees. To accurately predict forest biomass and carbon stocks, forest growth models need to include species and age specific parameters of biomass allocation patterns.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Agriculture, Policy and Development > Biodiversity, Crops and Agroecosystems Division > Crops Research Group
ID Code:18389
Uncontrolled Keywords:Biomass allocation; Forest trees; Growth efficiency; Allometric equations
Publisher:Elsevier

Download Statistics for this item.

Centaur Editors: Update this record

Page navigation