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The power of NMR. Part 1: the beginnings

Brown, G. (2008) The power of NMR. Part 1: the beginnings. ChemEd NZ. pp. 20-29. ISSN 0111-0586

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Abstract/Summary

Nuclear mnagnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy involves the excitation of nuclei by electromagnetic radiation in the radio-frequency range of the electromagnetic spectrum. For a nucleus to absorb energy from radiowaves in this way, it must hve the quantum mechanical property of spin. A spinning nucleus, such as that of the hydrogen atom, will dopt one f only two possible states when placed in a magnetic field. (In NMR, the hydrogen nucleus is often referred to as a proton, and is given the abbreviation 1H.) Az the strength of the magnetic field is increased, there is a proportional increase in the energy 'gap' between these two states. We can predic the resonant frequency at which any spinning nucleus will absorb energy from radio-frequency radiation as it jumps from the lower energy state to the upper state.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Chemistry, Food and Pharmacy > Department of Chemistry
ID Code:18760
Publisher:New Zealand Institute of Chemistry

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