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A step toward the wet surface chemistry of glycine and alanine on Cu{110}: destabilization and decomposition in the presence of near-ambient water vapor

Shavorskiy, A., Aksoy, F., Grass, M. E., Liu, Z., Bluhm, H. and Held, G. (2011) A step toward the wet surface chemistry of glycine and alanine on Cu{110}: destabilization and decomposition in the presence of near-ambient water vapor. Journal of the American Chemical Society, 133 (17). pp. 6659-6667. ISSN 0002-7863

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To link to this article DOI: 10.1021/ja110910y

Abstract/Summary

The coadsorption of water with organic molecules under near-ambient pressure and temperature conditions opens up new reaction pathways on model catalyst surfaces that are not accessible in conventional ultrahigh-vacuum surfacescience experiments. The surface chemistry of glycine and alanine at the water-exposed Cu{110} interface was studied in situ using ambient-pressure photoemission and X-ray absorption spectroscopy techniques. At water pressures above 10-5 Torr a significant pressure-dependent decrease in the temperature for dissociative desorption was observed for both amino acids, accompanied by the appearance of a newCN intermediate, which is not observed for lower pressures. The most likely reaction mechanisms involve dehydrogenation induced by O and/or OH surface species resulting from the dissociative adsorption of water. The linear relationship between the inverse decomposition temperature and the logarithm of water pressure enables determination of the activation energy for the surface reaction, between 213 and 232 kJ/mol, and a prediction of the decomposition temperature at the solidliquid interface by extrapolating toward the equilibrium vapor pressure. Such experiments near the equilibrium vapor pressure provide important information about elementary surface processes at the solidliquid interface, which can be retrieved neither under ultrahigh vacuum conditions nor from interfaces immersed in a solution.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Chemistry, Food and Pharmacy > Department of Chemistry
Interdisciplinary centres and themes > Chemical Analysis Facility (CAF)
ID Code:20443
Publisher:American Chemical Society

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