Accessibility navigation


Whose land was it anyway? The Crichel Down Rules and the sale of public land

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

Gibbard, R., (2002) Whose land was it anyway? The Crichel Down Rules and the sale of public land. Working Papers in Land Management & Development. 01/02. Working Paper. University of Reading, Reading. pp38.

[img] Text - Published Version
· Please see our End User Agreement before downloading.

80Kb

Abstract/Summary

The guiding principle of compulsory purchase of interests in land in England and Wales is that of fairness, best stated in the words of Lord Justice Scott in Horn v Sunderland Corporation when he said that the owner has “the right to be put, so far as money can do it, in the same position as if his land had not been taken from him”. In many instances, land acquired by compulsion subsequently becomes surplus to the requirements of the acquiring authority. This may be because the intended development scheme was scrapped, or substantially modified, or that after the passage of time the use of the land for which the purchase took place is no longer required. More controversially it may be that for ‘operational reasons’ the acquiring authority knowingly purchased more land than was required for the scheme. Under these circumstances, the Crichel Down Rules (‘the Rules’) require government departments and other statutory bodies to offer back to the former owners or their successors, any land previously so acquired by, or under the threat of, compulsory purchase.

Item Type:Report (Working Paper)
Divisions:Henley Business School > Real Estate and Planning
ID Code:24237
Publisher:University of Reading
Publisher Statement:The copyright of each working paper remains with the author. If you wish to quote from or cite any paper please contact the appropriate author; in some cases a more recent version of the paper may have been published elsewhere.

Download Statistics for this item.

Centaur Editors: Update this record

Page navigation