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Resilience planning, economic change and the politics of post-recession development in London and Hong Kong

Raco, M. and Street, E. (2012) Resilience planning, economic change and the politics of post-recession development in London and Hong Kong. Urban Studies, 49 (5). pp. 1065-1087. ISSN 1360-063X

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To link to this article DOI: 10.1177/0042098011415716

Abstract/Summary

For much of the 1990s and 2000s, the emphasis of urban policy in many global cities was on managing and mitigating the social and environmental effects of rapid economic growth. The credit crunch of 2008 and the subsequent recession have undermined some of the core assumptions on which such policies were based. It is in this context that the concept of resilience planning has taken on a new significance. Drawing on contemporary research in London and Hong Kong, the paper shows how resilience and recovery planning has become a key area of political debate. It examines what is meant by conservative and radical interpretations of resilience and how conservative views have come to dominate ‘recovery’ thinking, with élite groups unwilling to accept the limits to the neo-liberal orthodoxies that helped to precipitate the economic crisis. The paper explores the implications of such thinking for the politics of urban development.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Henley Business School > Real Estate and Planning
ID Code:24633
Publisher:Sage

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