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Hydrogen-bonding-driven self-assembly of PEGylated organosilica nanoparticles with poly(acrylic acid) in aqueous solutions and in layer-by-layer deposition at solid surfaces

Irmukhametova, G., Fraser, B., Keddie, J., Mun, G. and Khutoryanskiy, V. V. (2012) Hydrogen-bonding-driven self-assembly of PEGylated organosilica nanoparticles with poly(acrylic acid) in aqueous solutions and in layer-by-layer deposition at solid surfaces. Langmuir, 28 (1). pp. 299-306. ISSN 0743-7463

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To link to this article DOI: 10.1021/la2038735

Abstract/Summary

PEGylated organosilica nanoparticles have been synthesized through self-condensation of (3-mercaptopropyl)trimethoxysilane in dimethyl sulfoxide into thiolated nanoparticles with their subsequent reaction with methoxypoly(ethylene glycol) maleimide. The PEGylated nanoparticles showed excellent colloidal stability over a wide range of pH in contrast to the parent thiolated nanoparticles, which have a tendency to aggregate irreversibly under acidic conditions (pH < 3.0). Due to the presence of a poly(ethylene glycol)-based corona, the PEGylated nanoparticles are capable of forming hydrogen-bonded interpolymer complexes with poly(acrylic acid) in aqueous solutions under acidic conditions, resulting in larger aggregates. The use of hydrogen-bonding interactions allows more efficient attachment of the nanoparticles to surfaces. The alternating deposition of PEGylated nanoparticles and poly(acrylic acid) on silicon wafer surfaces in a layer-by-layer fashion leads to multilayered coatings. The self-assembly of PEGylated nanoparticles with poly(acrylic acid) in aqueous solutions and at solid surfaces was compared to the behavior of linear poly(ethylene glycol). The nanoparticle system creates thicker layers than the poly(ethylene glycol), and a thicker layer is obtained on a poly(acrylic acid) surface than on a silica surface, because of the effects of hydrogen bonding. Some implications of these hydrogen-bonding-driven interactions between PEGylated nanoparticles and poly(acrylic acid) for pharmaceutical formulations are discussed.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Chemistry, Food and Pharmacy > School of Pharmacy > Pharmaceutics Research Group
Interdisciplinary centres and themes > Chemical Analysis Facility (CAF) > Electron Microscopy Laboratory (CAF)
Interdisciplinary centres and themes > Chemical Analysis Facility (CAF)
ID Code:25923
Publisher:American Chemical Society

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