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The high-water mark. The siting of megalithic tombs on the Swedish island of Tjorn

Bradley, R. and Phillips, T. (2004) The high-water mark. The siting of megalithic tombs on the Swedish island of Tjorn. Oxford Journal of Archaeology, 23 (2). pp. 123-133.

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To link to this article DOI: 10.1111/j.1468-0092.2004.00205.x

Abstract/Summary

In 1977 Grahame Clark suggested that the siting of megalithic tombs along the west coast of Scandinavia reflected the distribution of productive fishing grounds. Unlike the situation in other parts of Europe, these monuments were not associated with agriculture. Opinions have varied over the last quarter century, but enough is now known about changes of sea-level for his interpretation to be investigated on the ground. There seems to have been considerable diversity. On the large island of Örust some of the tombs located near to the sea appear to be associated with small natural enclosures defined by rock outcrops and may have been associated with grazing land. On the neighbouring island of Tjörn, however, the tombs were associated with small islands and important sea channels. During the Bronze Age the same areas included carvings of ships. Recent fieldwork in western Norway suggests that such locations were especially important in a maritime economy.

Item Type:Article
Divisions:Faculty of Science > School of Archaeology, Geography and Environmental Science > Department of Archaeology
Faculty of Science > School of Archaeology, Geography and Environmental Science > Social Archaeology
ID Code:3317
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