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Implicit learning and imperceptible influence: Syncretic literacy of multilingual Chinese children.

Curdt-Christiansen, X. L. (2012) Implicit learning and imperceptible influence: Syncretic literacy of multilingual Chinese children. Journal of Early Childhood Literacy, 13 (3). pp. 348-370. ISSN 1741-2919

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1177/1468798412455819

Abstract/Summary

This article reports on an ethnographic study involving the literacy practices of two multilingual Chinese children from two similar yet different cultural and linguistic contexts: Montreal and Singapore. Using syncretism as a theoretical tool, this inquiry examines how family environment and support facilitate children’s process of becoming literate in multiple languages. Informed by sociocultural theory, the inquiry looks in particular at the role of grandparents in the syncretic literacy practices of children. Through comparative analysis, the study reveals similarities and differences that, when considered together, contribute to our understanding of multilingual children’s creative forms of learning with regard to their rich literacy resources in multiple languages, the imperceptible influences of mediators, various learning styles and syncretic literacy practices.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Social Science > Institute of Education > Language and Literacy in Education
ID Code:33571
Publisher:Sage

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