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A molecular, morphological and cytological investigation of the identity of non-native Ludwigia (Onagraceae) populations in Britain

Armitage, J. D., Könyves, K., Bailey, J. P., David, J. C. and Culham, A. (2013) A molecular, morphological and cytological investigation of the identity of non-native Ludwigia (Onagraceae) populations in Britain. New Journal of Botany, 3 (2). pp. 88-95. ISSN 2042-3497

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1179/2042349713Y.0000000023

Abstract/Summary

A combined molecular, morphological and cytological analysis was used to study the identity and number of species of Ludwigia section Oligospermum occurring in British waterways. Only one taxon was identified for which the name L. grandiflora subsp. hexapetala (Hook. & Arn.) G.L. Nesom & Kartesz is preferred. A chromosome count of 2n = 80 was made for all plants tested and DNA evidence demonstrates that at least two clones are present in Britain. Morphological characters to differentiate L.grandiflora subsp. hexapetala and L. peploides subsp. montevidensis (Spreng.) P.H. Raven are provided. Though the production of fruit in Britain by apparently isolated populations is noted, repeated introduction into the wild from gardens is judged to be primarily responsible for the British distribution of the taxon. Legislative implications are considered and an amendment to Schedule 9 of the UK Wildlife and Countryside Act (1981) is strongly advocated.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Interdisciplinary centres and themes > Walker Institute
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Biological Sciences > Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Central Services > Academic and Governance Services > University Museums and Special Collections
ID Code:33970
Publisher:Maney Publishing
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