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Role of marine biology in glacial-interglacial CO2 cycles

Kohfield, K. E., Le Quere, C., Harrison, S. P. and Anderson, R. F. (2005) Role of marine biology in glacial-interglacial CO2 cycles. Science, 308 (5718). pp. 74-78. ISSN 0036-8075

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1126/science.1105375

Abstract/Summary

It has been hypothesized that changes in the marine biological pump caused a major portion of the glacial reduction of atmospheric carbon dioxide by 80 to 100 parts per million through increased iron fertilization of marine plankton, increased ocean nutrient content or utilization, or shifts in dominant plankton types. We analyze sedimentary records of marine productivity at the peak and the middle of the last glacial cycle and show that neither changes in nutrient utilization in the Southern Ocean nor shifts in plankton dominance explain the CO2 drawdown. Iron fertilization and associated mechanisms can be responsible for no more than half the observed drawdown.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Interdisciplinary centres and themes > Walker Institute
Faculty of Science > School of Archaeology, Geography and Environmental Science > Earth Systems Science
Faculty of Science > School of Archaeology, Geography and Environmental Science > Department of Geography and Environmental Science
Interdisciplinary centres and themes > Centre for Past Climate Change
ID Code:35936
Publisher:American Association for the Advancement of Science

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