Accessibility navigation


Drug holidays from ADHD medication: international experience over the past four decades

Ibrahim, K. and Donyai, P. (2015) Drug holidays from ADHD medication: international experience over the past four decades. Journal of Attention Disorders, 19 (7). pp. 551-568. ISSN 1087-0547

Full text not archived in this repository.

It is advisable to refer to the publisher's version if you intend to cite from this work. See Guidance on citing.

To link to this item DOI: 10.1177/1087054714548035

Abstract/Summary

Objective: ADHD is managed by stimulants that are effective but can cause growth retardation. Prescribers should ideally monitor children and trial a “drug holiday” to enable catch-up growth. Our aim was to map the experience of drug holidays from ADHD medication in children and adolescents. Method: A comprehensive search of the literature identified 22 studies published during the period 1972 to 2013. Results: Drug holidays are prevalent in 25% to 70% of families and are more likely to be exercised during school holidays. They test whether medication is still needed and are also considered for managing medication side effects and drug tolerance. The impact of drug holidays was reported in terms of side effects and ADHD symptoms. There was evidence of a positive impact on child growth with longer breaks from medication, and shorter breaks could reduce insomnia and improve appetite. Conclusion: Drug holidays from ADHD medication could be a useful tool with multiple purposes: assessment, management, prevention, and negotiation.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Chemistry, Food and Pharmacy > School of Pharmacy > Pharmacy Practice Research Group
ID Code:37607
Uncontrolled Keywords:ADHD, drug holiday, medication, children, adolescents
Publisher:Sage

University Staff: Request a correction | Centaur Editors: Update this record

Page navigation