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How distinctive is philosophers’ intuition talk?

Andow, J. (2015) How distinctive is philosophers’ intuition talk? Metaphilosophy, 46 (4-5). pp. 515-538. ISSN 1467-9973

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1111/meta.12151

Abstract/Summary

The word “intuition” is one frequently used in philosophy. It is often assumed that the way in which philosophers use the word, and others like it, is very distinctive. This claim has been subjected to little empirical scrutiny, however. This article presents the first steps in a qualitative analysis of the use of intuition talk in the academy. It presents the findings of two preliminary empirical studies. The first study examines the use of intuition talk in spoken academic English. The second examines the use of intuition talk in written academic English. It considers what these studies tell us about the distinctiveness of philosophical language and methods and considers some implications for evaluative and ameliorative methodology.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Social Science > School of Humanities > Philosophy
ID Code:48694
Publisher:Blackwell Publishing

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