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Critical reflections on participatory dissemination: coproducing research messages with young people

Evans, R. (2016) Critical reflections on participatory dissemination: coproducing research messages with young people. In: Evans, R., Holt, L. and Skelton, T. (eds.) Methodological Approaches. Geographies of children and young people, 2. Springer, Basel, pp. 67-96. ISBN 9789814585897

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1007/978-981-4585-89-7_27-1

Abstract/Summary

While the potential and limitations of participatory methodologies with children and young people have been widely debated, much less attention has been paid to processes of participatory dissemination. I discuss the benefits and critically reflect on the ethical dilemmas and methodological issues raised by participatory dissemination processes, drawing on my experiences of leading three small-scale research projects in East and West Africa. Participatory dissemination can engage young people and community members in the interpretation of the findings and co-production of research messages for different audiences. However, key ethical issues that need to be considered concern power relations, language barriers and the level of participation that can be achieved when working with marginalised young people in spaces which may be dominated by powerful adult professionals. The use of video and other visual methods raises ethical dilemmas about the time, resources and skills involved in co-production and the extent to which the power to film, edit and present remains with researchers or participants. Concerns about anonymity, confidentiality and decisions about online publishing and/or the dissemination of videos to different audiences are particularly pertinent when working with marginalised young people considered 'vulnerable'. While perhaps not an ideal form of participatory video or of action research methodologies, participatory dissemination nevertheless offers a means of engaging young people, community members, policymakers and practitioners in dialogue, which in turn may lead to societal impacts.

Item Type:Book or Report Section
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Interdisciplinary centres and themes > Walker Institute
Faculty of Science > School of Archaeology, Geography and Environmental Science > Human Environments
Faculty of Science > School of Archaeology, Geography and Environmental Science > Department of Geography and Environmental Science
ID Code:66389
Uncontrolled Keywords:Participatory dissemination; Co-production; Research impact; Participatory video; Creative methods; Reflexivity Cross-cultural research Language issues Africa
Additional Information:Springer Living Reference Work
Publisher:Springer

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