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Intuition-talk: virus or virtue?

Andow, J. (2017) Intuition-talk: virus or virtue? Philosophia, 45 (2). pp. 523-531. ISSN 1574-9274

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1007/s11406-016-9796-6

Abstract/Summary

The word ‘intuition’ is used frequently both in philosophy and in discussions about philosophical methods. It has been argued that this intuition-talk makes no (clear) semantic contribution and that intuition-talk is thus a bad habit that ought to be abandoned. I urge caution in making this inference. There are many pragmatic roles intuition-talk might play. Moreover, according to one plausible story (for which there is some empirical support), there is reason to think intuition-talk is actually a good habit for philosophers to have.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Social Science > School of Humanities > Philosophy
ID Code:68318
Publisher:Springer Verlag

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