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Asymmetric nanoparticle may go “active” at room temperature

Sheng, N., Tu, Y., Guo, P., Wan, R., Wang, Z. and Fang, H. (2017) Asymmetric nanoparticle may go “active” at room temperature. Science China Physics, Mechanics & Astronomy, 60 (4). 040511. ISSN 1869-1927

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1007/s11433-016-9001-x

Abstract/Summary

Using molecular dynamics simulations, we show that an asymmetrically shaped nanoparticle in dilute solution possesses a spontaneously curved trajectory within a finite time interval, instead of the generally expected random walk. This unexpected dynamic behavior has a similarity to that of active matters, such as swimming bacteria, cells, or even fish, but is of a different physical origin. The key to the curved trajectory lies in the non-zero resultant force originated from the imbalance of the collision forces acted by surrounding solvent molecules on the asymmetrically shaped nanoparticle during its orientation regulation. Theoretical formulae based on microscopic observations have been derived to describe this non-zero force and the resulting motion of the asymmetrically shaped nanoparticle.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Science > School of Mathematical, Physical and Computational Sciences > Department of Mathematics and Statistics
ID Code:69289
Publisher:Springer

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