Accessibility navigation


Hydrometeorological determinants of green roof performance via a vertically-resolved model for heat and water transport

Sun, T., Bou-Zeid, E., Wang, Z.-H., Zerba, E. and Ni, G.-H. (2013) Hydrometeorological determinants of green roof performance via a vertically-resolved model for heat and water transport. Building and Environment, 60. pp. 211-224. ISSN 0360-1323

Full text not archived in this repository.

It is advisable to refer to the publisher's version if you intend to cite from this work. See Guidance on citing.

To link to this item DOI: 10.1016/j.buildenv.2012.10.018

Abstract/Summary

In this study, the Princeton ROof Model (PROM) is developed, validated and used to simulate the hygrothermal dynamics of green roof systems. PROM is embedded within the framework of the Princeton Urban Canopy Model, with a multi-layer spatially-analytical heat transfer scheme and an improved hydrological module. The model is validated by comparing simulated surface temperature and soil moisture to the measurements at two experimental sites, one in Beijing, China and the other in New Jersey, USA. The results demonstrate that PROM is able to capture the diurnal cycle of roof temperatures and the soil moisture dynamics of green roofs with high accuracy. Driven by a 30-day summertime meteorological forcing from July 2001, PROM is used to investigate the green roof thermal improvement to the urban indoor and outdoor environments, compared to conventional roofs. The impact of green roofs is significant in reducing surface temperatures, and outdoor and indoor heat fluxes during this summer period. To quantify this thermal improvement, three indices related to surface temperature, outdoor heat flux and indoor heat flux, are introduced; and the dependence of these indices on hydrological and meteorological conditions is investigated. The results indicate that incoming solar radiation and medium layer moisture are the main determinants of the green roof performance.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Science > School of Mathematical, Physical and Computational Sciences > Department of Meteorology
ID Code:71101
Publisher:Elsevier

University Staff: Request a correction | Centaur Editors: Update this record

Page navigation