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Determining the mode, frequency, and azimuthal wave number of ULF waves during a HSS and moderate geomagnetic storm

Murphy, K. R., Inglis, A. R., Sibeck, D. G., Rae, I. J., Watt, C. E. J., Silveira, M., Plaschke, F., Claudepierre, S. G. and Nakamura, R. (2018) Determining the mode, frequency, and azimuthal wave number of ULF waves during a HSS and moderate geomagnetic storm. Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics, 123 (8). ISSN 2169-9402

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1029/2017JA024877

Abstract/Summary

Ultra-low frequency (ULF) waves play a fundamental role in the dynamics of the inner-magnetosphere and outer radiation belt during geomagnetic storms. Broadband ULF wave power can transport energetic electrons via radial diffusion and discrete ULF wave power can energize electrons through a resonant interaction. Using observations from the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission, we characterize the evolution of ULF waves during a high-speed solar wind stream (HSS) and moderate geomagnetic storm while there is an enhancement of the outer radiation belt. The Automated Flare Inference of Oscillations (AFINO) code is used to distinguish discrete ULF wave power from broadband wave power during the HSS. During periods of discrete wave power and utilizing the close separation of the MMS spacecraft, we estimate the toroidal mode ULF azimuthal wave number throughout the geomagnetic storm. We concentrate on the toroidal mode as the HSSs compresses the day side magnetosphere resulting in an asymmetric magnetic field topology where toroidal mode waves can interact with energetic electrons. Analysis of the mode structure and wave numbers demonstrates that the generation of the observed ULF waves is a combination of externally driven waves, via the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, and internally driven waves, via unstable ion distributions. Further analysis of the periods and toroidal azimuthal wave numbers suggests that these waves can couple with the core electron radiation belt population via the drift resonance during the storm. The azimuthal wave number and structure of ULF wave power (broadband or discrete) have important implications for the inner-magnetospheric and radiation belt dynamics.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Science > School of Mathematical, Physical and Computational Sciences > Department of Meteorology
ID Code:78108
Publisher:American Geophysical Union

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