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Use of the Extended Fujita method for representing the molecular weight and molecular weight distributions of native and processed oat beta-glucans

Channell, G. A., Adams, G. G., Lu, Y., Gillis, R. B., Dinu, V., Grundy, M. M.-L., Bajka, B., Butterworth, P. J., Ellis, P. R., Mackie, A., Ballance, S. and Harding, S. E. (2018) Use of the Extended Fujita method for representing the molecular weight and molecular weight distributions of native and processed oat beta-glucans. Scientific Reports, 8 (1). 11809. ISSN 2045-2322

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1038/s41598-018-29997-0

Abstract/Summary

Beta 1–3, 1–4 glucans (“beta-glucans”) are one of the key components of the cell wall of cereals, complementing the main structural component cellulose. Beta-glucans are also an important source of soluble fbre in foods containing oats with claims of other benefcial nutritional properties such as plasma cholesterol lowering in humans. Key to the function of beta-glucans is their molecular weight and because of their high polydispersity - molecular weight distribution. Analytical ultracentrifugation provides a matrix-free approach (not requiring separation columns or media) to polymer molecular weight distribution determination. The sedimentation coefficient distribution is converted to a molecular weight distribution via a power law relation using an established procedure known as the Extended Fujita approach. We establish and apply the power law relation and Extended Fujita method for the frst time to a series of native and processed oat beta-glucans. The application of this approach to beta-glucans from other sources is considered.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Agriculture, Policy and Development > Food Production and Quality Division > Animal, Dairy and Food Chain Sciences (ADFCS)
ID Code:78539
Publisher:Nature Publishing Group

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