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Understanding (non-) adoption of conservation agriculture in Kenya using the reasoned action approach

Van Hulst, F. J. and Posthumus, H. (2016) Understanding (non-) adoption of conservation agriculture in Kenya using the reasoned action approach. Land Use Policy, 56. pp. 303-314. ISSN 0264-8377

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1016/j.landusepol.2016.03.002

Abstract/Summary

In recent years, Conservation Agriculture has been promoted in sub-Saharan Africa as an alternativefarming system for smallholder farmers to address declining soil productivity and climate change. CAhas to be tailored to the agro-ecological and socio-economic context of smallholder farmers to achieveimpact. But even if there is a ‘perfect fit’, the farmer still has his or her own reasons to choose whether toswitch to CA or not. This paper explores the reasons why farmers choose for CA or conventional farming,using the Reasoned Action Approach. Based on findings from a recent study in Kenya among CA farmerfield school members and their neighbours, the farmer’s decision making is analysed by distinguishingthree elements in the decision-making process: the farmer’s attitude towards CA, the farmer’s perceptionof the social norms towards CA, and the farmer’s perceived behavioural control (PBC) over practicing CA.Strong evidence was found that attitude and PBC are contributing to intentions to adopt CA practices. It isconcluded that experimentation and learning are key to support intentions and adoption of CA, becausethey contribute both to realistic attitudes towards CA and an improved perceived behavioural control.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Interdisciplinary centres and themes > Walker Institute
Interdisciplinary centres and themes > Centre for Food Security
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Agriculture, Policy and Development > Economic and Social Sciences Division > Food Economics and Marketing (FEM)
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Agriculture, Policy and Development > Economic and Social Sciences Division > Livelihoods Research
ID Code:80272
Uncontrolled Keywords:technology adoption; agricultural innovation, small-scale farming
Publisher:Elsevier

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