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Determinants of fruit and vegetable intake in England: a re-examination based on quantile regression

Boukouvalas, G., Shankar, B. and Traill, W. B. (2009) Determinants of fruit and vegetable intake in England: a re-examination based on quantile regression. Public Health Nutrition, 12 (11). pp. 2183-2191. ISSN 1368-9800

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To link to this article DOI: 10.1017/s1368980009005175

Abstract/Summary

Objective To examine die sociodemographic determinants of fruit and vegetable (F&V) consumption in England and determine the differential effects of socioeconomic variables at various parts of the intake distribution, with a special focus on severely inadequate intakes Design Quantile regression, expressing F&V intake as a function of sociodemographic variables, is employed. Here, quantile regression flexibly allows variables such as ethnicity to exert effects on F&V intake that. vary depending oil existing levels of intake. Setting The 2003 Health survey of England. Subjects Data were from 11044 adult individuals. Results The influence of particular sociodemographic variables is found to vary significantly across the intake distribution We conclude that women consume more F&V than men, Asians and Hacks mole dian Whites, co-habiting individuals more than single-living ones Increased incomes and education also boost intake However, the key general finding of the present study is that the influence of most variables is relatively weak in the area of greatest concern, i e among those with the most inadequate intakes in any reference group. Conclusions. Our findings emphasise the importance of allowing the effects of socio-economic drivers to vary across the intake distribution The main finding, that variables which exert significant influence on F&V Intake at other parts Of the conditional distribution have a relatively weak influence at the lower tail, is cause for concern. It implies that in any defined group, those consuming the lease F&V are hard to influence using compaigns or policy levers.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Agriculture, Policy and Development
ID Code:8339
Uncontrolled Keywords:Fruit and vegetables, Socio-economic determinants, United Kingdom, Regression, uk womens cohort, consumption, behavior, health

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