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Spatiotemporal variation in precipitation during rainy season in Beibu Gulf, South China, from 1961 to 2016

Liu, Z., Yang, H. and Wei, X. (2020) Spatiotemporal variation in precipitation during rainy season in Beibu Gulf, South China, from 1961 to 2016. Water, 12 (4). 1170. ISSN 2073-4441

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To link to this item DOI: 10.3390/w12041170

Abstract/Summary

The spatiotemporal variation in precipitation is an important part of water cycle change, which is directly associatedwith the atmospheric environment and climate change. The high-resolution spatiotemporal change of precipitation is still unknown inmany areas despite its importance. This study analyzed the spatiotemporal variation in precipitation in Beibu Gulf, South China, during the rainy season (fromApril to September) in the period of 1961–2016. The precipitation datawere collected from 12 national standard rain-gauge observation stations. The spatiotemporal variation in precipitation was evaluated with incidence rate and contribution rate of precipitation. The tendency of variations was analyzed using the Mann–Kendall method. The precipitation in the rainy season contributed 80% to the total annual precipitation. In general, there was an exponential decreasing tendency between the precipitation incidence rate and increased precipitation durations. The corresponding contribution rate showed a downward trend after an initial increase. The precipitation incidence rate decreased with the rising precipitation grades, with a gradual increase in contribution rate. The precipitation incidence rate and contribution rate of 7–9 d durations showed the significant downward trends that passed the 95% level of significance test. The results provide a new understanding of precipitation change in the last five decades, which is valuable for predicting future climate change and extreme weather prevention and mitigation.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Science > School of Archaeology, Geography and Environmental Science > Department of Geography and Environmental Science
ID Code:90239
Publisher:MDPI

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