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Memory properties in cloud--resolving simulations of the diurnal cycle of deep convection

Daleu, C. L., Plant, R. S., Woolnough, S. J., Stirling, A. J. and Harvey, N. J. (2020) Memory properties in cloud--resolving simulations of the diurnal cycle of deep convection. Journal of Advances in Modeling Earth Systems. ISSN 1942-2466 (In Press)

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1029/2019MS001897

Abstract/Summary

A series of high-resolution three{dimensional simulations of the diurnal cycle of deep convection over land are performed using the new​ Met Office NERC cloud-resolving model. This study features scattered​ convection. A memory function is defined to identify the effects of previous convection in modifying current convection. It is based on the probability of finding rain at time t0 and at an earlier time t0-Dt compared​ to the expected probability given no memory. The memory is examined as​ a function of the lag time Dt. It is strongest at grey-zone scales of 4-10 km,​ there is a change of behaviour for spatial scales between 10-15 km, and it​ is reduced substantially for spatial scales larger than 25 km. At grey-zone​ scales, there is a first phase of the memory function which represents the persistence of convection and it is maintained for about an hour. There is a second phase which represents the suppression of convection in regions which​ were raining 1 to 3 hours previously, and subsequently a third phase which​ represents a secondary enhancement of precipitation. The second and third​ phases of the memory function develop earlier for weaker forcing.​ When thermodynamic fluctuations resulting from the previous day are allowed to influence the development of convection on the next day, there are​ fewer rainfall events with relatively large sizes, which are more intense and​ thus, decay and recover more slowly, in comparison to the simulations where​ feedback from previous days is removed. Further sensitivity experiments reveal that convective memory attributed to these thermodynamic fluctuations resides in the lower troposphere.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Science > School of Mathematical, Physical and Computational Sciences > Department of Mathematics and Statistics
Faculty of Science > School of Mathematical, Physical and Computational Sciences > Department of Meteorology
ID Code:91673
Publisher:American Geophysical Union

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