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AI in marketing, consumer research and psychology: a systematic literature review and research agenda

Mariani, M. M. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7916-2576, Perez‐Vega, R. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-1619-317X and Wirtz, J. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6297-4498 (2021) AI in marketing, consumer research and psychology: a systematic literature review and research agenda. Psychology & Marketing. ISSN 0742-6046 (In Press)

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1002/mar.21619

Abstract/Summary

This study is the first to provide an integrated view on the body of knowledge of artificial intelligence (AI) published in the marketing, consumer research, and psychology literature. By leveraging a systematic literature review using a data‐driven approach and quantitative methodology (including bibliographic coupling), this study provides an overview of the emerging intellectual structure of AI research in the three bodies of literature examined. We identified eight topical clusters: (1) memory and computational logic; (2) decision making and cognitive processes; (3) neural networks; (4) machine learning and linguistic analysis; (5) social media and text mining; (6) social media content analytics; (7) technology acceptance and adoption; and (8) big data and robots. Furthermore, we identified a total of 412 theoretical lenses used in these studies with the most frequently used being: (1) the unified theory of acceptance and use of technology; (2) game theory; (3) theory of mind; (4) theory of planned behavior; (5) computational theories; (6) behavioral reasoning theory; (7) decision theories; and (8) evolutionary theory. Finally, we propose a research agenda to advance the scholarly debate on AI in the three literatures studied with an emphasis on cross‐fertilization of theories used across fields, and neglected research topics.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Henley Business School > Leadership, Organisations and Behaviour
ID Code:102140
Publisher:Wiley

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