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Atmospheric waves and global seismoacoustic observations of the January 2022 Hunga eruption, Tonga

Matoza, R. S., Fee, D. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-0693-347X, Assink, J. D., Iezzi, A. M., Green, D. N., Kim, K., Toney, L., Lecocq, T., Krishnamoorthy, S., Lalande, J.-M., Nishida, K., Gee, K. L., Haney, M. M., Ortiz, H. D., Brissaud, Q., Martire, L., Rolland, L., Vergados, P., Nippress, A., Park, J. , Shani-Kadmiel, S., Witsil, A., Arrowsmith, S., Caudron, C., Watada, S., Perttu, A. B., Taisne, B., Mialle, P., Le Pichon, A., Vergoz, J., Hupe, P., Blom, P. S., Waxler, R., De Angelis, S., Snively, J. B., Ringler, A. T., Anthony, R. E., Jolly, A. D., Kilgour, G., Averbuch, G., Ripepe, M., Ichihara, M., Arciniega-Ceballos, A., Astafyeva, E., Ceranna, L., Cevuard, S., Che, I.-Y., De Negri, R., Ebeling, C. W., Evers, L. G., Franco-Marin, L. E., Gabrielson, T. B., Hafner, K., Harrison, R. G. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-0693-347X, Komjathy, A., Lacanna, G., Lyons, J., Macpherson, K. A., Marchetti, E., McKee, K. F., Mellors, R. J., Mendo-Pérez, G., Mikesell, T. D., Munaibari, E., Oyola-Merced, M., Park, I., Pilger, C., Ramos, C., Ruiz, M. C., Sabatini, R., Schwaiger, H. F., Tailpied, D., Talmadge, C., Vidot, J., Webster, J. and Wilson, D. C. (2022) Atmospheric waves and global seismoacoustic observations of the January 2022 Hunga eruption, Tonga. Science. ISSN 1095-9203

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1126/science.abo7063

Abstract/Summary

The 15 January 2022 climactic eruption of Hunga volcano, Tonga, produced an explosion in the atmosphere of a size that has not been documented in the modern geophysical record. The event generated a broad range of atmospheric waves observed globally by various ground-based and spaceborne instrumentation networks. Most prominent is the surface-guided Lamb wave (≲0.01 Hz), which we observed propagating for four (+three antipodal) passages around the Earth over six days. Based on Lamb wave amplitudes, the climactic Hunga explosion was comparable in size to that of the 1883 Krakatau eruption. The Hunga eruption produced remarkable globally-detected infrasound (0.01–20 Hz), long-range (~10,000 km) audible sound, and ionospheric perturbations. Seismometers worldwide recorded pure seismic and air-to-ground coupled waves. Air-to-sea coupling likely contributed to fast-arriving tsunamis. We highlight exceptional observations of the atmospheric waves.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Science > School of Mathematical, Physical and Computational Sciences > Department of Meteorology
ID Code:105147
Publisher:American Association for the Advancement of Science

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