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Physical environmental and contextual drivers of occupants’ manual space heating override behaviour in UK residential buildings

Bruce-Konuah, A., Jones, R. V. and Fuertes, A. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6224-1489 (2019) Physical environmental and contextual drivers of occupants’ manual space heating override behaviour in UK residential buildings. Energy and Buildings, 183. pp. 129-138. ISSN 0378-7788

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1016/j.enbuild.2018.10.043

Abstract/Summary

This paper investigates the physical environmental (indoor and outdoor temperature and relative humidity, wind speed, solar radiation and rainfall) and contextual drivers (time of day) affecting occupants’ manual space heating override behaviour during the heating season based on measurements collected in ten UK dwellings. Logistic regression modelling is used to understand the probability of occupants manually overriding their scheduled heating periods. To the authors’ knowledge, these are the first stochastic models of manual heating override behaviour developed for residential buildings. The work reported in this paper suggests that occupants’ manual overrides are influenced by indoor and outdoor temperature, indoor relative humidity, and solar radiation. In addition, the effects of the physical environmental variables varied in relation to the time of day. At night, none of the physical environmental variables influenced manual overrides. In the morning, afternoon and evening, manual overrides were governed by a mix of indoor air temperature, indoor relative humidity and solar radiation. The models presented can be used in building performance simulation applications to improve the inputs for space heating behaviour in residential buildings and thus the predictions of energy use and indoor environmental conditions.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:No Reading authors. Back catalogue items
Science > School of the Built Environment > Construction Management and Engineering
Science > School of the Built Environment > Energy and Environmental Engineering group
Science > School of the Built Environment > Organisation, People and Technology group
ID Code:105791
Publisher:Elsevier

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