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Borderless heat hazards with bordered impacts

Brimicombe, C., Di Napoli, C., Cornforth, R., Pappenberger, F., Petty, C. and Cloke, H. L. (2021) Borderless heat hazards with bordered impacts. Earth's Future, 9 (9). e2021EF002064. ISSN 2328-4277

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1029/2021EF002064

Abstract/Summary

Heatwaves are increasing in frequency, duration, and intensity due to climate change. They are associated with high mortality rates and cross-sectional impacts including a reduction in crop yield and power outages. Here we demonstrate that there are large deficiencies in reporting of heatwave impacts in international disasters databases, international organisation reports and climate bulletins. We characterise the distribution of heat stress across the world focusing on August In the Northern Hemisphere, when notably heatwaves have taken place (i.e. 2003,2010 and 2020) for the last 20 years using the ERA5-HEAT reanalysis of the Universal Thermal Comfort Index (UTCI) and establish heat stress has grown larger in extent, more so during a heatwave. Comparison of heat stress against the Emergency Events impacts database (EM-DAT) and climate reports reveals underreporting of heatwave-related impacts. This work suggests an internationally agreed protocol should be put in place for impact reporting by organisations and national government, facilitating implementation of preparedness measures and early warning systems.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Interdisciplinary Research Centres (IDRCs) > Walker Institute
Science > School of Archaeology, Geography and Environmental Science > Department of Geography and Environmental Science
Life Sciences > School of Agriculture, Policy and Development > Economic and Social Sciences Division > Food Economics and Marketing (FEM)
ID Code:99938
Publisher:Wiley

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