Accessibility navigation


Probiotics for the developing world

Reid, G., Anand, S., Bingham, M.O., Mbugua, G., Wadstrom, T., Fuller, R., Anukam, K. and Katsivo, M. (2005) Probiotics for the developing world. Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology, 39 (6). pp. 485-488. ISSN 0192-0790

Full text not archived in this repository.

It is advisable to refer to the publisher's version if you intend to cite from this work. See Guidance on citing.

Official URL: http://journals.lww.com/jcge/pages/default.aspx

Abstract/Summary

Every minute of every day more and more children die of diarrheal diseases and women, and girls become infected by HIV An estimated 7,000 women become infected each day. While many valiant efforts are being made to address these issues, until now they have proved to be markedly ineffective. The notion that lactic acid bacteria, formulated into food or dietary supplements, could have a role to play in slowing the morbidity and mortality associated with HIV/AIDS and gastroenteritis, is built upon sound clinical findings and scientific investigations, yet no international efforts have been placed in this approach, to date. We hereby summarize the reasons why such efforts should be made, provide an example of one model being set up in sub-Saharan Africa, and challenge the international community to consider the potential benefits of probiotics, especially for communities not reached by governmental and nongovernmental agencies.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Chemistry, Food and Pharmacy > Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences
ID Code:13055
Uncontrolled Keywords:HIV/AIDS, developing world, probiotics, lactobacilli, HUMAN-IMMUNODEFICIENCY-VIRUS, PLACEBO-CONTROLLED TRIAL, BACTERIAL, VAGINOSIS, LACTOBACILLUS STRAINS, ACUTE DIARRHEA, VAGINAL FLORA, CHILDREN, MULTICENTER, PREVENTION, INFECTION

University Staff: Request a correction | Centaur Editors: Update this record

Page navigation