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Prebiotics

Manning, T.S. and Gibson, G.R. (2004) Prebiotics. Best Practice & Research in Clinical Gastroenterology, 18 (2). pp. 287-298. ISSN 1521-6918

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To link to this article DOI: 10.1016/j.bpg.2003.10.008

Abstract/Summary

In nutritional sciences there is much interest in dietary modulation of the human gut. The gastrointestinal tract, particularly the colon, is very heavily populated with bacteria. Most bacteria are benign; however, certain gut species are pathogenic and may be involved in the onset of acute and chronic disorders. Bifidobacteria and lactobacilli are thought to be beneficial and are common targets for dietary intervention. Prebiotic is a non-viable food ingredient selectively metabolized by beneficial intestinal bacteria. Dietary modulation of the gut microflora by prebiotics is designed to improve health by stimulating numbers and/or activities of the bifidobacteria and lactobacilli. Having an 'optimal' gut microflora can increase resistance to pathogenic bacteria, lower blood ammonia, increase stimulation of the immune response and reduce the risk of cancer. This chapter examines how prebiotics are being applied to the improvement of human health and reviews the scientific evidence behind their use.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Chemistry, Food and Pharmacy > Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences
ID Code:13168
Uncontrolled Keywords:prebiotic, oligosaccharides, gut microflora, bifidobacteria, lactobacilli functional food, HUMAN INTESTINAL MICROFLORA, FRUCTO-OLIGOSACCHARIDES, DIETARY, OLIGOFRUCTOSE, CALCIUM-ABSORPTION, FECAL MICROFLORA, BOWEL HABIT, HUMAN, COLON, INULIN, BACTERIA, BIFIDOBACTERIA

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