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Effect of citric acid and glycine addition on acrylamide and flavor in a potato model system

Low, M.Y., Koutsidis, G., Parker, J.K., Elmore, J.S., Dodson, A.T. and Mottram, D.S. (2006) Effect of citric acid and glycine addition on acrylamide and flavor in a potato model system. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 54 (16). pp. 5976-5983. ISSN 0021-8561

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To link to this article DOI: 10.1021/jf060328x

Abstract/Summary

Acrylamide levels in cooked/processed food can be reduced by treatment with citric acid or glycine. In a potato model system cooked at 180 degrees C for 10-60 min, these treatments affected the volatile profiles. Strecker aldehydes and alkylpyrazines, key flavor compounds of cooked potato, were monitored. Citric acid limited the generation of volatiles, particularly the alkylpyrazines. Glycine increased the total volatile yield by promoting the formation of certain alkylpyrazines, namely, 2,3-dimethylpyrazine, trimethylpyrazine, 2-ethyl-3,5-dimethylpyrazine, tetramethylpyrazine, and 2,5-diethyl-3- methylpyrazine. However, the formation of other pyrazines and Strecker aldehydes was suppressed. It was proposed that the opposing effects of these treatments on total volatile yield may be used to best advantage by employing a combined treatment at lower concentrations, especially as both treatments were found to have an additive effect in reducing acrylamide. This would minimize the impact on flavor but still achieve the desired reduction in acrylamide levels.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Chemistry, Food and Pharmacy > Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences
ID Code:13190
Uncontrolled Keywords:acrylamide, flavor, pH, citric acid, glycine, potato, Strecker, aldehydes, pyrazines, MAILLARD REACTION, HEATED FOODSTUFFS, REACTION-PRODUCTS, FRENCH FRIES, MECHANISMS, COMPONENTS, CHEMISTRY, ALDEHYDES, ORIGIN, CEREAL

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