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Antioxidant properties of carotenoids in vitro and in vivo

Kiokias, S. and Gordon, M.H. (2004) Antioxidant properties of carotenoids in vitro and in vivo. Food Reviews International, 20 (2). pp. 99-121. ISSN 8755-9129

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1081/fri-120037155

Abstract/Summary

Carotenoids are a class of natural pigments familiar to all through the orange-red to yellow colors of many fruits, vegetables, and flowers, as well as for the provitamin A activity that some of them possess. A body of scientific evidence suggests that carotenoids may scavenge and deactivate free radicals, acting thereby as antioxidants both in food systems (in vitro) and in the human organism (in vivo). Overall, epidemiological evidence links higher carotenoid intakes and tissue concentrations with reduced cancer and cardiovascular disease risk. However, research has also shown that the antioxidant activity of carotenoids may shift to a prooxidant character depending mainly on the biological environment in which they act. A summary of the antioxidant potential of natural carotenoids both in oil model systems and in vivo is presented in this article.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Chemistry, Food and Pharmacy > Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences
ID Code:13251
Uncontrolled Keywords:carotenoids, free radicals, antioxidants, prooxidant character, LOW-DENSITY-LIPOPROTEIN, OXYGEN PARTIAL PRESSURES, OXIDATIVE, DNA-DAMAGE, BETA-CAROTENE, VITAMIN-E, DIETARY SUPPLEMENTATION, LIPID-PEROXIDATION, ALPHA-TOCOPHEROL, FREE-RADICALS, SOYBEAN OIL

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