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Dissociating mere exposure and repetition priming as a function of word type

Butler, L. T., Berry, D. C. and Helman, S. (2004) Dissociating mere exposure and repetition priming as a function of word type. Memory & Cognition, 32 (5). pp. 759-767. ISSN 0090-502X

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Official URL: http://mc.psychonomic-journals.org/content/32/5.to...

Abstract/Summary

The mere exposure effect is defined as enhanced attitude toward a stimulus that has been repeatedly exposed. Repetition priming is defined as facilitated processing of a previously exposed stimulus. We conducted a direct comparison between the two phenomena to test the assumption that the mere exposure effect represents an example of repetition priming. In two experiments, having studied a set of words or nonwords, participants were given a repetition priming task (perceptual identification) or one of two mere exposure (affective liking or preference judgment) tasks. Repetition printing was obtained for both words and nonwords, but only nonwords produced a mere exposure effect. This demonstrates a key boundary for observing the mere exposure effect, one not readily accommodated by a perceptual representation systems (Tulving & Schacter, 1990) account, which assumes that both phenomena should show some sensitivity to nonwords and words.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences
ID Code:14129
Uncontrolled Keywords:TRANSFORMED 3-DIMENSIONAL OBJECTS, IMPLICIT MEMORY, SUBLEXICAL, COMPONENTS, RECOGNITION, ATTRIBUTION, FAMILIARITY, REFLECTION, JUDGMENTS, FEELINGS, FLUENCY

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