Accessibility navigation


Dissociating mere exposure and repetition priming as a function of word type

Butler, L. T., Berry, D. C. and Helman, S. (2004) Dissociating mere exposure and repetition priming as a function of word type. Memory & Cognition, 32 (5). pp. 759-767. ISSN 0090-502X

Full text not archived in this repository.

It is advisable to refer to the publisher's version if you intend to cite from this work. See Guidance on citing.

Official URL: http://mc.psychonomic-journals.org/content/32/5.to...

Abstract/Summary

The mere exposure effect is defined as enhanced attitude toward a stimulus that has been repeatedly exposed. Repetition priming is defined as facilitated processing of a previously exposed stimulus. We conducted a direct comparison between the two phenomena to test the assumption that the mere exposure effect represents an example of repetition priming. In two experiments, having studied a set of words or nonwords, participants were given a repetition priming task (perceptual identification) or one of two mere exposure (affective liking or preference judgment) tasks. Repetition printing was obtained for both words and nonwords, but only nonwords produced a mere exposure effect. This demonstrates a key boundary for observing the mere exposure effect, one not readily accommodated by a perceptual representation systems (Tulving & Schacter, 1990) account, which assumes that both phenomena should show some sensitivity to nonwords and words.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences
ID Code:14129
Uncontrolled Keywords:TRANSFORMED 3-DIMENSIONAL OBJECTS, IMPLICIT MEMORY, SUBLEXICAL, COMPONENTS, RECOGNITION, ATTRIBUTION, FAMILIARITY, REFLECTION, JUDGMENTS, FEELINGS, FLUENCY

University Staff: Request a correction | Centaur Editors: Update this record

Page navigation