Accessibility navigation


IQ in children with autism spectrum disorders: data from the Special Needs and Autism Project (SNAP)

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

Charman, T., Pickles, A., Simonoff, E., Chandler, S., Loucas, T. and Baird, G. (2010) IQ in children with autism spectrum disorders: data from the Special Needs and Autism Project (SNAP). Psychological Medicine, 41 (3). pp. 619-627. ISSN 1469-8978

[img] Text - Accepted Version
· Please see our End User Agreement before downloading.

86Kb

To link to this article DOI: 10.1017/S0033291710000991

Abstract/Summary

Background Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) was once considered to be highly associated with intellectual disability and to show a characteristic IQ profile, with strengths in performance over verbal abilities and a distinctive pattern of ‘peaks’ and ‘troughs’ at the subtest level. However, there are few data from epidemiological studies. Method Comprehensive clinical assessments were conducted with 156 children aged 10–14 years [mean (s.d.)=11.7 (0.9)], seen as part of an epidemiological study (81 childhood autism, 75 other ASD). A sample weighting procedure enabled us to estimate characteristics of the total ASD population. Results Of the 75 children with ASD, 55% had an intellectual disability (IQ<70) but only 16% had moderate to severe intellectual disability (IQ<50); 28% had average intelligence (115>IQ>85) but only 3% were of above average intelligence (IQ>115). There was some evidence for a clinically significant Performance/Verbal IQ (PIQ/VIQ) discrepancy but discrepant verbal versus performance skills were not associated with a particular pattern of symptoms, as has been reported previously. There was mixed evidence of a characteristic subtest profile: whereas some previously reported patterns were supported (e.g. poor Comprehension), others were not (e.g. no ‘peak’ in Block Design). Adaptive skills were significantly lower than IQ and were associated with severity of early social impairment and also IQ. Conclusions In this epidemiological sample, ASD was less strongly associated with intellectual disability than traditionally held and there was only limited evidence of a distinctive IQ profile. Adaptive outcome was significantly impaired even for those children of average intelligence.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Interdisciplinary centres and themes > ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorders) Research Network
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Department of Clinical Language Sciences
ID Code:17903
Uncontrolled Keywords:Adaptive behaviour, autism, autism spectrum disorders, IQ, pervasive developmental disorders, SNAP
Publisher:Cambridge University Press

Download Statistics for this item.

University Staff: Request a correction | Centaur Editors: Update this record

Page navigation