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Early identification of stimulant treatment responders, partial responders and non-responders using objective measures in children and adolescents with hyperkinetic disorder

Vogt, C. and Williams, T. (2011) Early identification of stimulant treatment responders, partial responders and non-responders using objective measures in children and adolescents with hyperkinetic disorder. Child and Adolescent Mental Health, 16 (3). pp. 144-149. ISSN 1475-3588

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1111/j.1475-3588.2010.00593.x

Abstract/Summary

Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate stimulant medication response following a single dose of methylphenidate (MPH) in children and young people with hyperkinetic disorder using infrared motion analysis combined with a continuous performance task (QbTest system) as objective measures. The hypothesis was put forward that a moderate testdose of stimulant medication could determine a robust treatment response, partial response and non-response in relation to activity, attention and impulse control measures. Methods: The study included 44 children and young people between the ages of 7-18 years with a diagnosis of hyperkinetic disorder (F90 & F90.1). A single dose-protocol incorporated the time course effects of both immediate release MPH and extended release MPH (Concerta XL, Equasym XL) to determine comparable peak efficacy periods post intake. Results: A robust treatment response with objective measures reverting to the population mean was found in 37 participants (84%). Three participants (7%) demonstrated a partial response to MPH and four participants (9%) were determined as non-responders due to deteriorating activity measures together with no improvements in attention and impulse control measures. Conclusion: Objective measures provide early into prescribing the opportunity to measure treatment response and monitor adverse reactions to stimulant medication. Most treatment responders demonstrated an effective response to MPH on a moderate testdose facilitating a swift and more optimal titration process.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Department of Psychology
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Psychopathology and Affective Neuroscience
ID Code:18192
Uncontrolled Keywords:ADD/ADHD, Methylphenidate, Computerised testing, Drug effects
Publisher:Wiley

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