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A prospective longitudinal study of the impact of early postnatal vs. chronic maternal depressive symptoms on child development

Sutter-Dallay, A.-L., Murray, L., Dequae-Merchadou, L., Glatigny-Dallay, E., Bourgeois, M.-L. and Verdoux, H. (2011) A prospective longitudinal study of the impact of early postnatal vs. chronic maternal depressive symptoms on child development. European Psychiatry, 26 (8). pp. 484-489. ISSN 0924-9338

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To link to this article DOI: 10.1016/j.eurpsy.2010.05.004

Abstract/Summary

Background Few studies of the effects of postnatal depression on child development have considered the chronicity of depressive symptoms. We investigated whether early postnatal depressive symptoms (PNDS) predicted child developmental outcome independently of later maternal depressive symptoms. Methods In a prospective, longitudinal study, mothers and children were followed-up from birth to 2 years; repeated measures of PNDS were made using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS); child development was assessed using the Bayley Scales II. Multilevel modelling techniques were used to examine the association between 6 week PNDS, and child development, taking subsequent depressive symptoms into account. Results Children of mothers with 6 week PNDS were significantly more likely than children of non-symptomatic mothers to have poor cognitive outcome; however, this association was reduced to trend level when adjusted for later maternal depressive symptoms. Conclusion Effects of early PNDS on infant development may be partly explained by subsequent depressive symptoms.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Interdisciplinary centres and themes > Winnicott
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Psychopathology and Affective Neuroscience
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Department of Psychology
ID Code:22044
Uncontrolled Keywords:Postnatal depression; Child development; Cohort Sensitive period
Publisher:Elsevier

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