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Identification of genetic and phenotypic differences associated with prevalent and non-prevalent Salmonella Enteritidis phage types: analysis of variation in amino acid transport

Pan, Z. S., Carter, B., Nunez-Garcia, J., AbuOun, M., Fookes, M., Ivens, A., Woodward, M. J. and Anjum, M. F. (2009) Identification of genetic and phenotypic differences associated with prevalent and non-prevalent Salmonella Enteritidis phage types: analysis of variation in amino acid transport. Microbiology-Sgm, 155. pp. 3200-3213. ISSN 1350-0872

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To link to this article DOI: 10.1099/mic.0.029405-0

Abstract/Summary

In this study, differences at the genetic level of 37 Salmonella Enteritidis strains from five phage types (PTs) were compared using comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) to assess differences between PTs. There were approximately 400 genes that differentiated prevalent (4, 6, 8 and 13a) and sporadic (11) PTs, of which 35 were unique to prevalent PTs, including six plasmid-borne genes, pefA, B, C, D, srgC and rck, and four chromosomal genes encoding putative amino acid transporters. Phenotype array studies also demonstrated that strains from prevalent PTs were less susceptible to urea stress and utilized L-histidine, L-glutamine, L-proline, L-aspartic acid, gly-asn and gly-gln more efficiently than PT11 strains. Complementation of a PT11 strain with the transporter genes from PT4 resulted in a significant increase in utilization of the amino acids and reduced susceptibility to urea stress. In epithelial cell association assays, PT11 strains were less invasive than other prevalent PTs. Most strains from prevalent PTs were better biofilm formers at 37 degrees C than at 28 degrees C, whilst the converse was true for PT11 strains. Collectively, the results indicate that genetic and corresponding phenotypic differences exist between strains of the prevalent PTs 4, 6, 8 and 13a and non-prevalent PT11 strains that are likely to provide a selective advantage for strains from the former PTs and could help them to enter the food chain and cause salmonellosis.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Chemistry, Food and Pharmacy > Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences > Food Microbial Sciences Research Group
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ID Code:28305

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