Accessibility navigation


Lipoma preferred partner is a mechanosensitive protein regulated by nitric oxide in the heart

Hooper, C. L., Dash, P. R. and Boateng, S. Y. (2012) Lipoma preferred partner is a mechanosensitive protein regulated by nitric oxide in the heart. FEBS Open Bio, 2. pp. 135-144. ISSN 2211-5463 (In Press)

Full text not archived in this repository.

To link to this article DOI: 10.1016/j.fob.2012.05.005

Abstract/Summary

Adaptor proteins play an important role in signaling pathways by providing a platform on which many other proteins can interact. Malfunction or mislocalization of these proteins may play a role in the development of disease. Lipoma preferred partner (LPP) is a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling adaptor protein. Previous work shows that LPP plays a role in the function of smooth muscle cells and in atherosclerosis. In this study we wanted to determine whether LPP has a role in the myocardium. LPP expression increased by 56% in hearts from pressure overload aortic-banded rats (p < 0.05 n = 4), but not after myocardial infarction, suggesting hemodynamic load regulates its expression. In vitro, LPP expression was 87% higher in cardiac fibroblasts than myocytes (p < 0.05 n = 3). LPP expression was downregulated in the absence of the actin cytoskeleton but not when microtubules were disassembled. We mechanically stretched cardiac fibroblasts using the Flexcell 4000 for 48 h (1 Hz, 5% maximum strain), which decreased total LPP total expression and membrane localization in subcellular fractions (p < 0.05, n = 5). However, L-NAME, an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS), significantly upregulated LPP expression. These findings suggest that LPP is regulated by a complex interplay between NO and mechanical cues and may play a role in heart failure induced by increased hemodynamic load.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Biological Sciences > Biomedical Sciences
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Chemistry, Food and Pharmacy > School of Pharmacy > Division of Pharmacology
ID Code:28666
Publisher:Elsevier

Centaur Editors: Update this record

Page navigation