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Employee turnover, HRM and institutional contexts

Croucher, R., Wood, G., Brewster, C. and Brookes, M. (2012) Employee turnover, HRM and institutional contexts. Economic and Industrial Democracy, 33 (4). pp. 605-620. ISSN 1461-7099

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To link to this article DOI: 10.1177/0143831X11424768

Abstract/Summary

Literature on comparative capitalism remains divided between approaches founded on stylized case study evidence and descriptions of broad trends, and those that focus on macro data. In contrast, this study explores the relevance of Amable’s approach to understanding differences in employment relations practice, based on firm-level micro data. The article examines employee–employer interdependence (including turnover rates) in different categories of economy as classified by Amable. The findings confirm that exit – whether forced or voluntary – remains more common in market-based economies than in their continental counterparts and that institutionalized employee voice is an important variable in reducing turnover. However, there is as much diversity within the different country categories as between them, and across continental Europe. In Denmark’s case, high turnover is combined with high unionization, showing the effects of a ‘flexicurity’ strategy. While employee voice may be stronger in Scandinavia, interdependence is weaker than in continental Europe.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Henley Business School > International Business and Strategy
ID Code:29816
Uncontrolled Keywords:comparative capitalism employee turnover Europe unions
Publisher:Sage

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