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What have dendritic cells ever done for adjuvant design? Cellular and molecular methods for the rational development of vaccine adjuvants

Edwards, A.D. (2013) What have dendritic cells ever done for adjuvant design? Cellular and molecular methods for the rational development of vaccine adjuvants. In: Flower , D. R. and Perrie, Y. (eds.) Immunomic Discovery of Adjuvants and Candidate Subunit Vaccines. Immunomics reviews (5). Springer, New York , pp. 131-154. ISBN 978-1-4614-5070-2

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1007/978-1-4614-5070-2_8

Abstract/Summary

Our new molecular understanding of immune priming states that dendritic cell activation is absolutely pivotal for expansion and differentiation of naïve T lymphocytes, and it follows that understanding DC activation is essential to understand and design vaccine adjuvants. This chapter describes how dendritic cells can be used as a core tool to provide detailed quantitative and predictive immunomics information about how adjuvants function. The role of distinct antigen, costimulation, and differentiation signals from activated DC in priming is explained. Four categories of input signals which control DC activation – direct pathogen detection, sensing of injury or cell death, indirect activation via endogenous proinflammatory mediators, and feedback from activated T cells – are compared and contrasted. Practical methods for studying adjuvants using DC are summarised and the importance of DC subset choice, simulating T cell feedback, and use of knockout cells is highlighted. Finally, five case studies are examined that illustrate the benefit of DC activation analysis for understanding vaccine adjuvant function.

Item Type:Book or Report Section
Refereed:No
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Chemistry, Food and Pharmacy > School of Pharmacy > Pharmaceutics Research Group
ID Code:30596
Publisher:Springer

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