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Lunar and solar FTIR nitric acid measurements at Eureka in winter 2001/2002: comparisons with observations at Thule and Kiruna and with CMAM and SLIMCAT model calculations

Farahani, F., Fast, H., Mittermeier, R. L., Makino, Y., Strong, K., McLandress, C., Shepherd, T. G., Chipperfield, M. P., Hannigan, J. W., Coffey, M., Mikuteit, S., Hase, F., Blumenstock, T. and Raffalski, U. (2007) Lunar and solar FTIR nitric acid measurements at Eureka in winter 2001/2002: comparisons with observations at Thule and Kiruna and with CMAM and SLIMCAT model calculations. Journal of Geophysical Research, 112. D01305. ISSN 0148-0227

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To link to this article DOI: 10.1029/2006JD007096

Abstract/Summary

For the first time, vertical column measurements of (HNO3) above the Arctic Stratospheric Ozone Observatory (AStrO) at Eureka (80N, 86W), Canada, have been made during polar night using lunar spectra recorded with a Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer, from October 2001 to March 2002. AStrO is part of the primary Arctic station of the Network for the Detection of Stratospheric Change (NDSC). These measurements were compared with FTIR measurements at two other NDSC Arctic sites: Thule, Greenland (76.5N, 68.8W) and Kiruna, Sweden (67.8N, 20.4E). The measurements were also compared with two atmospheric models: the Canadian Middle Atmosphere Model (CMAM) and SLIMCAT. This is the first time that CMAM HNO3 columns have been compared with observations in the Arctic. Eureka lunar measurements are in good agreement with solar ones made with the same instrument. Eureka and Thule HNO3 columns are consistent within measurement error. Differences among HNO3 columns measured at Kiruna and those measured at Eureka and Thule can be explained on the basis of the available sunlight hours and the polar vortex location. The comparison of CMAM HNO3 columns with Eureka and Kiruna data shows good agreement, considering CMAM small inter-annual variability. The warm 2001/02 winter with almost no Polar Stratospheric Clouds (PSCs) makes the comparison of the warm climate version of CMAM with these observations a good test for CMAM under no PSC conditions. SLIMCAT captures the magnitude of HNO3 columns at Eureka, and the day-to-day variability, but generally reports higher HNO3 columns than the CMAM climatological mean columns.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:No Reading authors. Back catalogue items
Faculty of Science > School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences > Department of Meteorology
ID Code:31789
Publisher:American Geophysical Union

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