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Co-eruptive and inter-eruptive surface deformation measured by satellite radar interferometry at Nyamuragira volcano, D.R. Congo, 1996 to 2010.

Toombs, A. and Wadge, G. (2012) Co-eruptive and inter-eruptive surface deformation measured by satellite radar interferometry at Nyamuragira volcano, D.R. Congo, 1996 to 2010. Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, 245-246. pp. 98-122. ISSN 0377-0273

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To link to this article DOI: 10.1016/j.jvolgeores.2012.07.005

Abstract/Summary

Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) measurements of surface deformation at Nyamuragira Volcano between 1996 and 2010 reveal a variety of co-eruptive and inter-eruptive signals. During 7 of the 8 eruptions in this period deformation was measured that is consistent with the emplacement of shallow near-vertical dykes feeding the eruptive fissures and associated with a NNW-trending fissure zone that traverses the summit caldera. Between eruptions the caldera and the summit part of this fissure zone subsided gradually (b3–5 cm/year). We also find evidence of post-eruption subsidence around the sites of the main vents of some flank eruptions (2002, 2004, 2006, and 2010). In the 6 months prior to the 2010 eruption a10-km wide zone centred on the caldera inflated by 1–2 cm. The low magnitude of this signal suggests that the presumed magma reservoir at 3–8 km depth contains highly compressible magma with little stored elastic strain energy. To the north of the caldera the fissure zone splits into WNW and NE branches around a zone that has a distinct InSAR signal. We interpret this zone to represent an elevated, 'stable' block of basement rocks buried by lavas within the Rift Zone.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Science > School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences > National Centre for Earth Observation (NCEO)
Faculty of Science > School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences > Environmental Systems Science Centre
Faculty of Science > School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences > Department of Meteorology
ID Code:34296
Publisher:Elsevier

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