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Expression of the guanine nucleotide exchange factor, mr-gef, is regulated during the differentiation of specific subsets of telencephalic neurons

Bithell, A., Alberta, J., Hornby, F., Stiles, C. D. and Williams, B. P. (2003) Expression of the guanine nucleotide exchange factor, mr-gef, is regulated during the differentiation of specific subsets of telencephalic neurons. Brain Research, 146 (1-2). pp. 107-18. ISSN 0006-8993

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1016/j.devbrainres.2003.09.017

Abstract/Summary

We have performed a screen combining subtractive hybridization with PCR to isolate genes that are regulated when neuroepithelial (NE) cells differentiate into neurons. From this screen, we have isolated a number of known genes that have not previously been associated with neurogenesis, together with several novel genes. Here we report that one of these genes, encoding a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF), is regulated during the differentiation of distinct neuronal populations. We have cloned both rat and mouse GEF genes and shown that they are orthologs of the human gene, MR-GEF, which encodes a GEF that specifically activates the small GTPase, Rap1. We have therefore named the rat gene rat mr-gef (rmr-gef) and the mouse gene mouse mr-gef (mmr-gef). Here, we will collectively refer to these two rodent genes as mr-gef. Expression studies show that mr-gef is expressed by young neurons of the developing rodent CNS but not by progenitor cells in the ventricular zone (VZ). The expression pattern of mr-gef during early telencephalic neurogenesis is strikingly similar to that of GABA and the LIM homeobox gene Lhx6, a transcription factor expressed by GABAergic interneurons generated in the ventral telencephalon, some of which migrate into the cortex during development. These observations suggest that mr-gef encodes a protein that is part of a signaling pathway involved in telencephalic neurogenesis; particularly in the development of GABAergic interneurons.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Chemistry, Food and Pharmacy > School of Pharmacy > Division of Pharmacology
ID Code:34713
Publisher:Elsevier

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