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Individual differences and the role of the L1 in L2 processing: an ERP investigation

Bond, K., Gabriele, A., Fiorentino, R. and Aleman Banon, J. (2011) Individual differences and the role of the L1 in L2 processing: an ERP investigation. In: Proceedings of the 11th Generative Approaches to Second Language Acquisition Conference (GASLA 2011), 25-27 March 2011, University of Washington, pp. 17-29.

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Official URL: http://www.lingref.com/cpp/gasla/11/index.html

Abstract/Summary

This study used ERP (event-related potentials) to examine both the role of the L1 and the role of individual differences in the processing of agreement violations. Theories of L2 acquisition differ with regard to whether or not native-like acquisition of L2 features is possible (Schwartz and Sprouse, 1994, 1996; Tsimpli and Mastropavlou, 2007), and the results of previous ERP studies are inconsistent when it comes to whether or not native-like processing is observed in response to L2 agreement violations (e.g., Sabourin, 2003; Tokowicz and MacWhinney, 2005). Furthermore, studies of learners in early stages of L2 acquisition have found variability in the emergence of native-like responses (e.g., McLaughlin et al., 2010; Tanner et al., 2009), but sources of variability have not been investigated. The current study examines responses to gender and number agreement violations in English-speaking learners of Spanish (n=24). Stimuli targeted agreement in three conditions: subject-verb agreement (el barco flota/*flotan), which is similar in Spanish and English; number agreement on adjectival predicates (la isla rocosa/*rocosas), a context in which agreement is not instantiated in English; and gender agreement on adjectival predicates (la isla rocosa/*rocoso), which is unique to Spanish. Grammaticality judgments and ERP responses were also tested for correlations with aptitude scores on the Modern Languages Aptitude Test (MLAT; Carroll and Sapon, 1959) and the Raven Advanced Progressive Matrices (Raven, 1965). Results are in line with theories that claim native-like processing is acquirable, since learners demonstrated similar ERP responses to a control group of native Spanish-speakers (n=8) with regard to all three agreement types. Additionally, the MLAT (but not the Raven) was significantly correlated with sensitivity to number violations, both in terms of grammaticality judgments and ERP amplitudes, indicating a role for verbal but not nonverbal aptitude in L2 processing.

Item Type:Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Department of Clinical Language Sciences
ID Code:35210
Additional Information:Bond, Kristi, Alison Gabriele, Robert Fiorentino, and José Alemán Bañón. 2011. Individual Differences and the Role of the L1 in L2 Processing: An ERP Investigation. In Proceedings of the 11th Generative Approaches to Second Language Acquisition Conference (GASLA 2011), ed. Julia Herschensohn and Darren Tanner, 17-29. Somerville, MA: Cascadilla Proceedings Project. www.lingref.com, document #2542.

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